'Unprecedented Level of Animus!' Strzok Gets His Smackdown for Anti-Trump Bias

Republican members of the House judiciary and oversight committees grilled Strzok as they argued that text messages he exchanged with FBI lawyer Lisa Page colored the outcome of the Clinton investigation and undercut the ongoing Russian Federation probe. The talk show host let highlights of the Capitol Hill testimony provide the jokes for him.

FBI agent Peter Strzok, whom Ingraham called "snooty and indignant", testified for hours before the joint committees about sending anti-Trump text messages while working on the FBI's investigation into Russian election interference in 2016.

An embattled Federal Bureau of Investigation agent whose anti-Trump text messages exposed the Justice Department to claims of institutional bias launched a vigorous defense Thursday at an extraordinary congressional hearing that devolved into shouting matches, finger pointing and veiled references to personal transgressions.

But there was one particular exchange, involving Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.), a social conservative, that stood out for its personal animus and, many charged, its hypocrisy.

"Under oath, as I spoke also during my interview to you a week or two ago, I have always told the truth", Strzok began.

Watch "Republicans Lose Their Minds", as "Jimmy Kimmel Live!" titled the segment, above. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisLive coverage: Tensions mount as Rosenstein grilled by GOP GOP lawmakers demand drafts of DOJ report on Clinton email investigation Live coverage: IG releases watchdog report on FBI, Clinton probe MORE (R-Fla.). "You've embarrassed them, you've embarrassed yourself, and I can't help but wonder when I see you looking there with a little smirk - how many times did you look so innocently into your wife's eye and lie to her about Lisa Page?".

Strzok replied that Trump won't.

In his most direct defense of the controversial texts, Strzok said he had written them "off-the-cuff" and that it was important to view them in the context of the heated election in 2016, during which Trump engaged in numerous outrageous, racially-charged feuds - including with the family of Muslim U.S. Army captain who was killed in Iraq in 2004.

Strzok angrily responded, saying the "we'll stop it" text came in response to campaign occurrences such as Trump insulting the immigrant father of a fallen USA soldier.

He said in his opening statement that his work has never been tainted by politics and the intense scrutiny he faces represents "just another victory notch in [Russian President Vladimir] Putin's belt".

In one exchange, Ms. Page, who also worked on both investigations, said to Mr. Strzok that Trump is "not ever going to become president, right?"

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Robert Goodlatte, R-Va., held open the possibility that the panel would still hold Strzok in contempt because he wouldn't answer questions about the ongoing Russian Federation investigation. Goodlatte said he was holding open the prospect of calling Strzok back again because he was unsatisfied with the lack of answers to some questions.

FBI Director Chris Wray has said employees who were singled out for criticism by the inspector general have been referred to internal disciplinary officials. Gowdy said, pointing out the pro-Hillary bias among other members of the investigative team who weren't booted from it.

Vanessa Coleman

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