Tropical Storm Bud grows off Mexico's Pacific coast

Aletta, the first tropical storm of the 2018 season in the Eastern Pacific Basin, is now moving west at around 7 miles per hour and will not be a threat to any land.

In just 24 hours, Aletta went from a tropical storm to a Category 4 hurricane, doubling its maximum sustained winds (70 mph to 140 mph) by the 9 a.m. MDT Friday National Hurricane Center advisory. It could grow into a Category 4 sometime Friday.

The Hurricane Center said the storm could generate swells that cause life-threatening surf and rip currents over the coming days.

There is a tropical depression that could strengthen to a hurricane while moving northwest toward the West Coast of Mexico, the National Hurricane Center said.

Eventually, Bud could help trigger a surge of moisture in the Desert Southwest where an increase in showers and storms may occur late in the week or next weekend.

It's too soon to determine whether this second system will eventually pose a direct threat to parts of Baja California next week.

It was about 555 miles (895 kilometers) south of the Baja California Peninsula. The average day for the first hurricane to form in the Eastern Pacific is June 26, although hurricanes are not unheard of before that date.

Also, Tropical Storm Bud formed Saturday night and is spinning off the Pacific coast of Mexico as a Category 1 storm.

While it may seem odd for the Pacific's first storm to be so strong, Weather.com meteorologist Jonathan Erdman discovered it's not all that uncommon.

Vanessa Coleman

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