Northern Lights may be visible from the Heartland Sunday night

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center rated it a moderate storm, level 2 on its 0 to 5 scale. It should move past the Earth this weekend.

When this mass arrives on Sunday, it will likely spark geomagnetic storms and brilliant auroras for the high latitudes.

This glow is what we know as an aurora or the Northern (Southern) Lights.

If you were anticipating a spectacular display of the Northern Lights Sunday night into Monday morning, chances are, you were disappointed.

What causes the Northern Lights?

Experts recommend to get far away from city lights or other light pollution and give your eyes 30 minutes or so to adjust to the darkness.

If you look north overnight, you could catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights over West Michigan.

As the wave gets closer to the earth, it will interact with magnetic field.

A Thursday explosion on the sun hurled streams of charged particles into space. They are usually less forecastable than the weather and there is never a guarantee that any one location will have an aurora burst. In Rhode Island, Massachusetts and CT, find the darkest sky you can and look north.

Mostly clear weather conditions, along with a strong geomagnetic storm, should make way for excellent viewing conditions of the spectacle. So, if you're on vacation in Northern New England you have a good chance of seeing the Aurora!

Vanessa Coleman

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