Launch of NOAA's JPSS-1 slips 24 hours

As Mitch Goldberg, the chief program scientist for JPSS at NASA told Space.com, meteorological catastrophes like hurricanes tend to originate far away from the places they affect. JPSS-1 will allow researchers to monitor changes in the atmosphere in Africa that could cause a hurricane off the coast of Florida, for example. "This transition of the second flight unit to the Joint Polar Satellite Systems not only capitalizes fully on that previous experience, but also demonstrates our commitment to developing a long-term partnership with both NASA and NOAA on this program". The Launch Configuration Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) measures the electromagnetic emissions and subjects it to expected electromagnetic radiation that the satellite would experience at the launch site.

Several instruments aboard the satellite will provide detailed observations of temperature, air moisture, ice, snow, fog, wildfires, precipitation and ozone around the world. Once it's operational, it will be renamed NOAA-20.

The timeframe to fire off the Delta II rocket is so short, just 66 seconds, the launch team did not have enough time to figure out a solution to move forward with the launch.

According to Space.com, JPSS-1 is meant to build off the work of other NOAA satellites. "We are proud to contribute to NOAA's continued leadership in critical weather forecasting throughout the entire JPSS series". Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and the Common Ground System.

The mission is scheduled to begin at 4:47 a.m. EST (1:47 a.m. PST), Nov. 10, 2017, with JPSS-1 atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket lifting off from Space Launch Complex 2 (SLC-2) at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Instruments on board were designed by Ball, along with Raytheon, Harris and Northrop Grumman.

The JPSS-1 is the first in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) next-generation of four polar-orbiting satellites that provide the majority of data streamed into weather forecasting models. This interagency effort (JPSS) is the latest generation of US polar-orbiting, non-geosynchronous environmental satellites.

The event is for credentialed reporters only.

Vanessa Coleman

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