Hurricane Irma literally sucks away Bahamas shoreline

This Sept. 6, 2017 photo provided by the Dutch Defense Ministry shows a few of the homes that remained intact in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, in St. Maarten.

"The back veranda was blown off, which also pulled down part of the wall in one of the bedrooms".

The two moved to higher ground Thursday with a local family originally from the Philippines and spent the night in living quarters "that kept getting smaller and smaller", Chamberlain said in her Friday morning video. You can also see some roof damage.

"Because of the damage to the house, we sought shelter in the kitchen pantry, which had the most solid walls, was away from windows and the only dry spot in the house".

Lowry and her friends have been in Turks and Caicos since September 2.

Richard Allan, a professor of climate science at Reading University, said hurricanes were likely to get worse as the oceans warmed due to the climate change caused by greenhouse gases.

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"Can we get to the different islands", he said. Chamberlain said they could find no way off the island after multiple calls to the airliner and embassy.

Lowry said airlines should know how many guests are in affected areas, in theory. "Recognizing too that they can't get here".

"Luckily Claire went into labour yesterday and delivered the baby, so in that sense we were very lucky that she didn't have to stay in a hospital tonight - it was just in the nick of time". "They said, it is going to be scary, it is going to be loud and noisy but you're going to be OK".

The four are scheduled to return to Calgary Sept. 16 via WestJet.

Mr. Misick has been campaigning for the islands to become independent of Britain and says there is no reason why they could not be as successful as neighboring Saint Kitts and Nevis, which was granted independence in 1983.

"They were so nervous and frightened by what was coming their way".

Vanessa Coleman

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