High fibre diets make for healthier lives

The results suggest a 15-30 per cent decrease in all-cause and cardiovascular related mortality when comparing people who eat the highest amount of fibre to those who eat the least. After looking at 40 years worth of studies and tests, he found that higher intakes of fiber reduced body weight, total cholesterol, and mortality.

The researchers added that while their study did not find any risks associated with dietary fibre, a high intake could negatively impact people with low iron or mineral levels, as high levels of whole grains can further reduce levels of iron.

People who eat extra fibre and whole grains are more likely to avoid certain diseases such as heart attacks, stroke, cancer and diabetes compared to people who eat lesser amounts, a review of all the available evidence has concluded.

High fiber intake was associated with lower levels of coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer. Based on the research, he recommends 25 grams (0.88 ounces) to 29 grams (1.02 ounces) of fiber each day.

The analysis found no dangers with a high fiber intake.

However, their findings imply that while low-carb diets are popular with people wishing to lose weight, this risks the health benefits from eating whole grain fibre.

The study found small risk reduction in stroke and Type 2 diabetes for people adhering to a low-glycemic-index diet, which involves foods like green vegetables, most fruits, kidney beans and bran breakfast cereals.

To achieve optimum health benefits it's important to consume a balance of different fibres - soluble, insoluble and fermentable, and all play important roles in helping us maintain a healthy gut.

Consuming just 30 grams of naturally-occurring dietary fibre daily may prevent you from of developing non-communicable diseases, revealed a latest study.

Speaking to The Guardian, Mann said that the findings considerably challenge many popular diets that reject carbohydrates due to their correlation with sugar.

The authors only included studies with healthy participants, so the findings can not be applied to people with existing chronic diseases.

Prof Mann said: "The health benefits of fibre are supported by over 100 years of research into its chemistry, physical properties, physiology and effects on metabolism".

"Our findings provide convincing evidence for nutrition guidelines to focus on increasing dietary fibre and on replacing refined grains with whole grains".

Foods rich in fibre include fruits, such as raspberries, bananas and apples (with skin on), and vegetables such as broccoli, turnip and sweetcorn. They also note that the study mainly relates to naturally-occurring fibre rich foods rather than synthetic and extracted fibre, such as powders, that can be added to foods.

Vanessa Coleman

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