California Sets Goal Of 100 Percent Renewable Electric Power By 2045

100 law in late August committing the state to a target of 100 percent clean electricity by 2045, becoming the second state to do so.

He also signed a bill, SB100, making the state's electricity completely emissions-free by 2045. He also issued an executive order calling for statewide carbon neutrality - meaning California "removes as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it emits" - by the same year.

The Global Climate Action Summit, which he will host later this week in San Francisco, was organized to encourage regional bodies, such as cities and states, to step up their own efforts to fight climate change where national governments have failed to act.

The new bill was supported by Democrats who emphasized the damaging consequences of climate change, while opposed by state Republicans who highlighted the policy's financial costs, Bradford reported. Yes, they do. So what we believe is that people are increasingly seeing the symptoms.

"Have no illusions", Brown said.

"California is committed to doing whatever is necessary to meet the existential threat of climate change", Brown said before he signed the bill in Sacramento.

While 32% of commercial energy sale a year ago was purchased from renewable sources, one glaring problem California faces is having the overall energy supply matchup with overall demand for electricity.

California is the second USA state after Hawaii to commit to carbon-free energy. Electricity is responsible for 16 percent of California's greenhouse gas emissions. Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles.

"California must take a stand and tell the world we are, as always, undeterred by those who wish to stop our progress and move backwards", Schwarzenegger wrote.

In addition to that target, the legislation establishes benchmarks, requiring energy service providers to generate 50 percent of power from renewable resources by 2026 and 60 percent by 2030.

About 26.9% of the state's generation now comes from hydro, with 26.9% from renewables and 43.3% from natural gas.

Renewable energy experts have looked to batteries that can store solar energy generated in the afternoon as one solution, but the technology is not ready for wide-scale deployment.

The nation's largest state now gets just over one-third of its energy from wind, solar or geothermal power, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

In 2017, California's zero-carbon sources - including nuclear, large hydroelectric and other renewable generation - accounted for more than 56 percent of total in-state generation of electricity.

Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows California is ranked sixth among states in crude oil production and 15th in natural gas, though production of both has declined since the mid-1980s.

Vanessa Coleman

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