Boeing wins Paris order race after launching new model

Airbus on Thursday signed deals with AirAsia, and privately-owned Iranian carriers Zagros Airlines and Iran Airtour.

The budget carrier plans to grow its operational fleet to 200 airplanes by the end of the decade and expand regionally with the new 737 MAX family of airplanes.

In the course of the Paris Air Show event this week, Boeing is hoping to get about 240 orders for the new plane that is valued at approximately $30 billion.

Boeing has won the order battle at the Paris Air Show after Airbus conceded it can not catch the US plane maker's tally.

"Boeing has been a proud partner of Malaysia Airlines for more than 40 years and we are honoured they are joining the 737 MAX 10 launch group", said Boeing Commercial Airplanes senior vice-president of global sales and marketing Ihssane Mounir.

Over three dozen pledges were received by Boeing at the Paris Air show for the new Max 10 that the Chicago, Illinois-based plane manufacturer is planning to launch. The sales tally in Paris was almost double that of last year's Farnborough Air Show, which alternates with Paris as the industry's marquee event.

Boeing, meanwhile, has a Paris order book of 463 when conversions, previous orders upgraded to newer planes, are stripped out.

Boeing announced it had signed a sales agreement with an "unidentified major airline" for 125 737 Max 8s valued at $14 billion.

The newly placed order will allow United to become the largest single 737 MAX 10 customer in the world. "They're clearly going to come after us on price."Both firms accuse each other of heavy discounting to win deals". Although the 737 lineup is the best-selling commercial aircraft in history, the A321neo has recently been more popular than the 737 MAX 9, which is Boeing's largest narrowbody, single-aisle jet now on the market.

"The 737 MAX's promised efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort make it a very compelling airplane for us in our domestic and regional network", Ruili GM Xie Jinguo said.

Vanessa Coleman

Comments