Beyond the Weather: Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend

While you can see the glowing pieces from July 14 through August 24, the peak is only over a few nights, from August 11th to the 13th.

The Perseids have presented a scintillating display for 2,000 years, according to NASA.

The Mleiha Archaeological and Eco-tourism Project in Sharjah has geared up its preparation for the Perseid Meteor Shower, scheduled to light the UAE skies on Sunday from 8pm to 1am.

People love the Perseid meteor shower because it's something they can view without any equipment; in fact a telescope is a waste of time, because the meteorites fly by so fast, Twarog said. These internationally recognized areas possess an exceptional quality of starry nights, making them ideal for shows like this one. The Perseids showcase more bright meteors than any other annual meteor shower. The meteors will appear to come from the constellation Perseus with Cassiopeia just above.

Jay Bjerke, president of the Fargo-Moorhead Astronomy Club, said the best location to view the meteor shower will be away from city lights. People can look directly overhead to see the meteors, as long as they are in a dark area without too much light pollution.

The comet has a 133-year orbit, last visiting our part of the solar system back in 1992 (hence the big meteor show back in the 90s). And even though there won't be as many shooting stars as in past years - in 2016, for example, there were as many as 200 visible meteors per hour - there will still be a boatload this weekend, with as many as 60 to 70 meteors per hour during its peak, Cooke told Space.com. But you don't need to stare at Perseus to spot meteors - in fact, it may be better to simply stare unfocused into the sky and let your more-sensitive peripheral vision do the heavy lifting.

"What we're seeing when we see meteors are little dust particles lighting up the atmosphere".

-Give your eyes about 30 minutes to adjust to the dark sky."Don't expect to walk outside and see Perseids", Cooke said. Our advice? Bring a rug, a flask of tea (or, you know, whiskey - pick your poison) and some insect repellent, and get gazing. As the cosmic junk - many the size of a grain of sand - enters the atmosphere, it burns up in a flash, appearing as "shooting stars" across the sky.

Vanessa Coleman

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